Brand identity – a guide to how we work part 2

Brand identity – a guide to how we work part 2

In the first post on the brand design for Pearson Fronter’s new product, Imagine, I  looked at the process of generating ideas. Now I’m going to show how those ideas were developed into actual logo designs for presentation to the client.

Getting on with it

Working with words and phrases, doodles and found images led to a number of ideas that seemed good enough to work up into some logo visuals for Imagine. Some of the initial designs are shown here. Each logo design had its own evolution through several stages, with each having several different variations – too many to show them all here. imagine logo concepts Imagine concepts Imagine concepts Imagine Concepts If you refer back to the mood board and mind map from part one, you’ll see several themes have been developed into the logo designs. And this is the one that Pearson Fronter chose to develop. Imagine concept designs Although all the ideas presented had one eye firmly on the brief, this was the one that was thought to be closest to fulfilling it. Firstly it was very different from logos used for other products in the school management or learning sector. And secondly it was seen to be readily adaptable to appeal to the very different target audiences that Imagine would be aimed at. Pearson Fronter particularly liked the idea that the logo could be used as a container for different photographic images – a good analogy for Imagine as a container for a suite of different applications. brand design for Imagine The shape of the letters, the shadow under the logo and the thickness of the keyline surrounding it were all careful refined over the next few stages. Finally we supplied the finished master logo to Pearson Fronter to be registered as a tradmark. Brand design The final instalment of this series will focus on the development of the brand design in the run-up to the product launch.
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